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#LifeOrKnife

How to have that conversation

The thought of seeing your child in trouble, hurt or even worse is a parent’s worst nightmare. So now is the right time to chat to your child about knife crime and the impact it can have.

We’ve put together some simple guidance to help you have that conversation, what to say, and explore routes for your child to avoid any potential future situations where a knife may be involved.

Download a takeaway how to have a conversation’ guide here.
Find a time to chat comfortably.
They might be reluctant to talk to you.
So open use a recent news event as a conversation starter.
Open up about your fears.
Discuss knives and how you both feel about them being used – you’re there to listen and support them.
Tell them even when they feel they don’t have choices,
they do.
Explain that knives do not give protection.
Carrying one could be a prison sentence or getting hurt yourself.
Say the bravest thing to do is walk away from a dangerous
situation.
Explore excuses for your child to walk away.
They might have to pick up their little brother, or arrange for you to call them if they send you a message.
Reassure them that most people do not carry knives.
Explain they can always report their concerns about anyonecarrying a knife anonymously through Fearless
or CrimeStoppers.

Meet James Brindley’s parents

Mark and Beverley never thought knife crime would affect them, until they lost their son James in Aldridge, Walsall on 23 June 2017.

James’ parents also urge you to have a conversation with you child now, and want to help you do that.

See more about James Brindley here.